Blog Archives

Canadian White Circle books

Many of the books I write about on this blog are so little known, little researched and little collected, that I can be reasonably confident that anything I write adds to the stock of recorded knowledge.  That’s why I do it.  No doubt I occasionally get things wrong, but the risk of being contradicted is fairly low.  The bigger risk is of not being contradicted and errors surviving uncorrected.

Some other books, like Penguins, are so well researched that I can draw on the existing stock of knowledge, while trying to find an angle that adds something new.

The Canadian editions of Collins White Circle fall somewhere inbetween.   As far as I can tell they’re not collected or researched by very many people, but there are certainly a few people who are far more knowledgeable than I am about them.  For a comprehensive listing and identification guide, see the Wollamshram World website, or for various blog posts, see the Canadian fly-by-night blog.  I can’t add much to that wealth of knowledge, but I want to put the Canadian editions into the context of the Collins White Circle editions in the UK and other countries.

CWC Canada 345 not my copy

The White Circle series was launched in the UK in 1936, replacing previous Collins paperback series with a new format much more similar to Penguin Books, whose own launch a few months earlier had so disrupted the UK paperback market.  All the books in the UK featured a large white circle on the cover as the title panel right from the start, and this served as the unifying feature of the designs used for the various sub-series.  However the White Circle name for the series only started to be used in early 1938.

The initiative to move overseas arose from the wartime conditions in Britain and the introduction of paper rationing.  Exporting books from the UK no longer made any sense, so setting up local publishing operations suddenly seemed the way forward.  Penguin started publishing in the US, Australia, New Zealand and Egypt, Collins in Australia, New Zealand, India and Ceylon as well as in Canada.  All of these ventures started around 1942.

  CC Christie Sad Cypress  Collins Indian F1

White Circle editions from Australia and India

In all these cases, the British publishers started off with what had become the market norm in the UK since the Penguin launch – standard designed covers with a strong series identity and no cover illustration.  In Australia, New Zealand, India and Ceylon they were more or less able to impose this format, but neither Penguin in the US, nor Collins in Canada could make it work.  The North American tradition of garishly illustrated covers was too strong and both companies eventually had to fall into line.

The first 50 titles for Collins White Circle in Canada, issued up until the end of 1942, were in a UK style format with standard designed covers.  Oddly the design didn’t feature a white circle, other than a very small circle for the Crime Club logo.  If anything it was more like the design used by Penguin in the UK, with large horizontal blocks of colour, although not I think as well designed.

CWC Canada S

The vast majority of the early books were either Crime or Mystery novels, all with the main cover panel in green and no real distinction between the two other than the small logo.   A handful of western titles were distinguished by a lighter green and blue cover, and general fiction / non-fiction titles had covers in orange.

By the beginning of 1943 though, Collins had concluded that standard designed covers could not work in the Canadian market in competition with the brightly illustrated covers of local and American paperbacks.  Like Penguin in the US at much the same time, they switched to illustrated covers, at first dipping their toe in, with restrained, stylised cover illustrations.  By the end of the war though, the covers were becoming noticeably brighter, usually featuring pictures of girls, often in various states of undress or submission.  And any evidence of white circles on the cover seemed to become even less prominent.

  CWC Canada 40  CWC Canada 224 not my copy

Editions from 1942 and 1946

The type of book was changing too.  The proportion of crime and mystery books was falling and in the post-war period there were more westerns and more romances.  There was a sprinkling of American authors, particularly of course for the westerns, and the occasional Canadian author, like Roderick Haig-Brown, but still most books were by British authors.  It looks as if books were almost entirely chosen from what the British parent had available, rather than being sourced locally.   Two books by Canadian broadcaster Kate Aitken – a cook book and a book on beauty for women, were a rare exception.

  CWC Canada 528 not my copy  CWC Canada 498 not my copy

The series continued through to 1952 before Collins called it a day.  Canada could no longer be treated as a market that would naturally take what British publishers had to offer.  Over a period of just over 10 years though, from 1942 to 1952, the series ran to well over 500 titles.  By my count that’s about the same as the number of titles published in the main UK series up to that point (excluding Services Editions).  In the end there were more UK editions, but only because the UK series continued for another 7 years, through to 1959.

It also seems to me that today there are more second-hand Canadian editions for sale than British editions, raising the possibility that print runs may actually have been higher in Canada than in the UK.   Far from being the junior partner in the arrangement, the Canadian business may actually have been stronger than the UK.

Advertisements