Studying with Tauchnitz – Part 1

As a German publisher selling books in English, Bernhard Tauchnitz had to find a market wherever he could.   Of course he wanted to sell to German nationals, but there were only a limited number of those who could read a whole novel in English.   He could not sell in Britain or the British Empire for copyright reasons, but he spread out to sell across the whole of the European Continent and beyond.  By selling his books in railway station bookstalls and specialist expatriate bookshops, he was able to target British and American expatriates and travellers as well.  That made a large enough market for a successful business.

But there was still another sizeable potential market, if he could reach it.  Those who were learning English in schools, in universities or as individual students at home.  Producing basic school text-books was a specialist market, but there were lots of students who had got past the basics, but would still find it difficult to read a full length novel in English.  Given the access Tauchnitz had to novels in English and to British authors, could he help to bridge the gap?

The first attempt was an anthology issued in 1844 called ‘Selections from British Authors in Prose and Poetry.  A class-book for the use of schools.’ by Edward Moriarty.  That’s according to the English language title page, although oddly the second title page, in German, refers to the book being for both school and personal use.  The book contains a series of prose extracts, following directly on from each other as chapters, with author names at the end of each chapter and then followed by 76 poems.

Tauchnitz A2 Title Page

Most of the authors were safely dead and out of copyright, but there were a small number still alive in 1844, which raises the question of whether the use of their work was authorised.  There was no international copyright convention in 1844, but by that time Tauchnitz was obtaining authorisation and making payment for all works in the main series.  There is no indication here that the book is authorised, even though it contains extracts from the works of Marryat, Bulwer and Dickens among others, writers who had given Tauchnitz early authorisation to publish editions of their novels.

The anthology remained in print for many years, but it was another three years before there was any follow-up and then it was in a rather different direction.   A special Schools Edition of ‘A Christmas Carol’ by Charles Dickens appeared in 1847, three to four years after the first publication of the story in December 1843.  Again the question of authorisation is not entirely clear.   Dickens had certainly given his authorisation for the initial publication by Tauchnitz of ‘A Christmas Carol’ and it appeared with the wording ‘Edition sanctioned by the Author’ on the title page.  In 1846 the first copyright agreements were put in place between Britain, Prussia and Saxony and later editions appeared with the wording ‘Copyright Edition’.   But the Schools Edition has no mention of either authorisation or copyright.  Was this an oversight, or did Tauchnitz just assume there was no need for any further payment to Dickens, given his existing rights?

A Christmas Carol Schools Edition title page

I’ve written a longer post on the Schools Edition of ‘A Christmas Carol’, which can be found here, so I won’t repeat it all, but the key change was to add at the end an English-German dictionary containing the more difficult words used in the book.  The story itself takes up only 78 pages, while the dictionary takes up 91, so it’s fairly comprehensive.  As it translates only into German, the book was presumably for sale only in German-speaking countries, a pattern that was to be followed for the next 90 years.  Tauchnitz never seems to have made any attempt to sell to schools or students in France, Italy or other countries.

After ‘A Christmas Carol’, it was another 6 years before the next edition specifically for students followed, and it was again to Charles Dickens that Tauchnitz turned.  ‘A Child’s History of England’ by Dickens was published in a standard edition by Tauchnitz in 1853, although outside the main series.  At more or less the same time it appeared in a special annotated edition, with a substantial dictionary attached to the second volume, but this time also with footnotes, explaining points of English grammar or style.

Sample footnote

A sample footnote, with German text in Gothic script.

This was now more or less the format that would eventually be developed into the Tauchnitz Students’ Editions, although they were still more than 30 years away.  Oddly there is again no mention of authorisation or copyright, this time on either the annotated edition or the standard edition, although it’s almost impossible to believe that Tauchnitz had not obtained and paid for the European copyright.

  Tauchnitz A12 Title Page  Tauchnitz A13 Title Page

So far then, we have a first attempt at a Schools Edition in 1844, another one three years later in 1847, then a gap of 6 years to 1853.  So it seems about right that it was then 10 years before Tauchnitz tried again.  A Schools Edition of ‘Tom Brown’s Schooldays’ appeared in 1863, this time with an introduction and glossary, although I have not seen a copy.  And the gaps continued to get larger.  The next attempt did not come for another 23 years.  And finally this time it was a more serious attempt to develop the market.  The first volume of the Tauchnitz Students’ Series for School, College and Home appeared in 1886.  I’ll leave the story of those volumes for Part 2.

 

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Posted on December 29, 2018, in Vintage Paperbacks and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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