Agatha Christie in Albatross Books

Albatross Books was founded in 1932 in Paris as a direct rival to the long-established firm of Tauchnitz, which had had a near-monopoly on the sale of English language books in Continental Europe for 90 years.   It was phenomenally successful in the period up to the Second World War, and its effects were felt long after that, particularly in its key influence on the launch and development of Penguin Books.

In that period, from 1932 to 1939, it would have been difficult to ignore Agatha Christie.  She dominated crime writing at the time, and crime writing was enjoying its golden age.  Yet in some ways it was just a happy coincidence that she was able to appear in the series.  There was no tradition of publishing detective stories in English on the continent.  Tauchnitz had published the Sherlock Holmes books from 1891 onwards, but had shown relatively little interest in other developments in crime fiction after the First World War.  Albatross too seemed at the start to be primarily interested in publishing literary fiction, championing D.H. Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce and Aldous Huxley amongst others.  In its first 50 books, there were just 7 crime stories.

Agatha Christie in Albatross

All that was to change though with the launch of the Albatross Crime Club in 1933.  It was effectively a joint venture with the Scottish publisher, Collins, and came about because of the presence of two of the Collins family on the Albatross board.   I don’t know how much of the initiative came from Collins, eager to establish a European outlet for their Collins Crime Club novels, and how much from Albatross, keen to expand their list into more crime novels.   But either way, it provided the platform for Albatross to publish the works of Agatha Christie, as well as other leading crime writers.

Albatross 115 Lord Edgware dies

And they seized the opportunity.   Over the six years of the Albatross Crime Club, it included 14 Agatha Christies, starting with ‘Lord Edgware dies’ as volume 115 in 1933.  Each volume followed shortly after its first appearance in the Collins Club, usually within a year, sometimes much quicker.  And although overall the Albatross Crime Club published far fewer books than the Collins Crime Club, it seems to have taken all the Christies it could get.  As far as I can tell, every Christie novel that appeared in the Collins series between ‘Lord Edgware dies’ in 1933 and ‘Appointment with death’ in 1938, was also published in Albatross.

The Albatross editions are not only the first continental European editions, they’re also the first paperback editions.  Collins didn’t launch the White Circle series of paperbacks in the UK until 1936, after Penguin’s launch.  The first volume in that series was ‘Murder on the Orient Express’, which had already been published by Albatross in 1934 (volume 121) and so far as I know all 14 of the pre-war Christie books published by Albatross were first paperback editions.

  Albatross 121 Murder on the Orient Express    White Circle 001

Albatross Crime Club edition (1934) and Collins Crime Club (1936)

Like all the Albatross editions, they’re beautiful books, and mostly not too difficult to find.  The print runs would have been relatively low, possibly only a couple of thousand copies of each book, so it’s unlikely that more than a couple of hundred survive, but they’re still out there to be found and usually not too expensive.   The first book, ‘Lord Edgware dies’ would have had a transparent dustwrapper, although these were naturally fragile and I have never seen a copy with the dustwrapper intact.  All the later books had paper dustwrappers in the same style as the covers.   I don’t think any of the books were reprinted, so all copies are first printings.

When Albatross attempted a revival after the Second World War, it still had some support from Collins, but it was much less successful and there was to be no re-launch for the Albatross Crime Club.  Instead a small number of crime titles were published in the main series, just four in total, but two of those were by Christie.  ‘Ten little niggers’ (since renamed as ‘And then there were none’ and televised recently by the BBC) appeared as volume 554 in 1947, followed by ‘One, two, buckle my shoe’ as volume 575 in 1950.  The first of these was again a paperback first printing, but the second may just have been beaten by the White Circle edition that appeared the same year.  It’s probably significant that unlike the pre-war publications, these were not recent novels, hot off the press.  Both had been written, and published in the Collins Crime Club, several years earlier.  Albatross was no longer the cutting edge publisher it had been in its pre-war glory.

Albatross 554 Ten little niggers

Overall though 16 Agatha Christie novels, all of them continental European first printings, and possibly 15 paperback first printings, is not a bad representation for the ‘Queen of Crime’ in Albatross.

For other paperback first printings, see also the story of Agatha Christie in UK Services Editions.

 

Advertisements

Posted on February 1, 2016, in Vintage Paperbacks and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: