Rex Stout in UK Services Editions

There seem to be surprisingly few early paperback editions of Rex Stout novels in the UK, but perhaps fittingly, one area where he was well recognised was in the Services Editions produced for the British Armed Forces.  I say fittingly, because it was Stout who established the Writers’ War Board in the US, and he was heavily involved in American efforts to use books to help win both the physical war and the “war of ideas”.

His early books had been published in the UK by Cassell & Co., but by the time war broke out, like most other crime writers, he had been enticed to the Collins Crime Club, and it was Collins who were by far the largest publisher of Services Editions.  The Guild Books series was longer, but as the Guild was an association of publishers, their series included books from a wide range of different companies, including both Cassell and Collins.

The first Stout novel to appear in a Services Edition was ‘Black Orchids’, a combination of two Nero Wolfe short stories that had been published in the US in 1942 and then in a Collins Crime Club edition in the UK in July 1943.  The Services Edition was not long after, published in 1943 as number c218 in the Collins series (which started at c201).  I’ve never seen a copy, and I’d love to hear from anyone who has one or knows of one.

The same goes for the next Rex Stout novel to appear in a Services Edition.  I’ve never seen a copy of ‘The red box’, but again I know it exists as number S133 of the Guild Books series, published in 1944.   This was one of the early Nero Wolfe novels, first published in the UK by Cassells.  So Stout became one of the very rare authors to appear in both the main series of UK Services Editions.

Guild Blank The red box

A mock-up of what ‘The red box’ might look like – if only I could find one!

After that it was back to the Collins series for two volumes published together in 1945 and featuring other private investigators.  Volume c313 was ‘Alphabet Hicks’ and c314 ‘The broken vase’, both stories that had been published in the US in 1941 and then in the Collins Crime Club in 1942.  Alphabet Hicks is a one-off mystery featuring Alfred ‘Alphabet’ Hicks and ‘The broken vase’ is the third Tecumseh Fox story.   These two are perhaps a little bit easier to find in Services Editions, but that’s only in relative terms.  Both were later published by Collins in standard White Circle paperbacks – The broken vase’ as volume 185c in 1950 and ‘Alphabet Hicks’ as 208c in 1952, and these editions are certainly easier to find.

Collins c313

 

Collins c314

And finally in 1946, there was a Services Edition of ‘Double for death’, the first of the Tecumseh Fox novels.  This had already been published in the main White Circle series, as volume 153c in 1945 and by the time it came out in a Services Edition, the programme was almost at an end.  Many, if not most, of the Services Edition copies never reached the armed forces, and were released for general sale.  So they’re mostly found these days with a WH Smith sticker on the front or the remains of one, authorising their sale, which at least means that they do turn up more often.

Collins c359

The timing of this post is to coincide with a series of posts on Rex Stout by the Tuesday night bloggers.  Click on the link to see other posts by the group.

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Posted on January 12, 2016, in Vintage Paperbacks and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Great to have you join us Al! Really interesting post – those types of covers are very familiar to me, though I don’t have any Stout ones in those editions.

  1. Pingback: The Tuesday Night Bloggers: Rex Stout, Week 2 | Noah's Archives

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